Monday, August 7, 2017

Replacement Windows

Mark recently did a replacement window job. The customer had gotten a ridiculously high price from one of those replacement window companies, so he called Mark. Mark put in Simonton 5300 series windows for a reasonable price.

One of the replacement windows before installation
Insulating around the window opening
The customers are very happy with their new replacement windows. They not only saved a lot of money over what they would have paid the window company, but they're going to save a lot on their heating bills, too.

Sunday, April 2, 2017

Spring Maintenance Check

It may not seem like it after yesterday's storm, but spring is here, and warmer weather is right around the corner. Now is the time to think about what that means for your house (or your company's building), if you haven't done it already. Here's a list to help you out:

Screens

Last year there was the Zika virus. With luck, the worst thing we'll get if biting flies and mosquitoes come inside will be uncomfortable bites, but it's far better to be prepared. It doesn't take long to be sure that all your screens are in place and in good condition.

Roof

What did your roof look like this winter? Did you have problems with ice dams? Did the snow melt in a geometric pattern? Can you see any dips or wavy lines in your roof? If you answered yes to any of these, either your roof or your attic needs work before it sees another winter.

Structural Check

It's always a good idea, especially with newer houses, to do a quick walk-through in the springtime to check for any structural damage that may have occurred over the winter. Signs to watch for are windows or doors that don't open and close easily, new cracks in walls (including foundation walls), and groups of nails that have come partially out of place.

Your Cooling Bill

The air is chilly and there's snow on the ground, which means that now is the perfect time to take care of your air conditioning needs for the summer. If you wait until you need it, there may be availability issues. And this way, you may be able to decide what you want and then wait for a sale. Two more important factors to consider are insulation and windows.

Outdoor Living

Now is also a good time to get started on planning patios, porches, decks and other outdoor living spaces you'll want to use this summer.

Thanks,


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Hardwood Stairs

A lot of homeowners are upgrading their old carpet or linoleum floors to hardwood, and it's certainly a great investment that really pays off in many ways. A related project is to replace an outdated or
worn out stairway with a sharp new set of hardwood stairs.

Here's a hardwood stairway job Mark recently did. He took off the old plywood treads and risers and put in clear oak treads and white risers. As always, he used solid oak for the treads, an inch thick. He hand-finished them with a minimum of three coats of polyurethane.




 
(The unpainted trim is at the customer's request.)







Thanks,
New Hampshire Construction

Monday, March 13, 2017

How to Prevent Ice Dams

It's going to snow tomorrow. Lots of snow is going to pile up on roofs all over New Hampshire, and
at the bottoms of a lot of those roofs, ice dams are going to form. And every single one of those ice dams could have been prevented. Here's how:

The cause of ice dams is heat from indoors leaking out and causing some of the snow that's on the roof to melt. This melted snow runs down the roof until it hits the eaves (the overhang, where suddenly there's no heat escaping and everything's cold again) and quickly refreezes. The process continues until there's so much ice built up on top of the eaves that it keeps snow from sliding off. And that's not the worst part. As the ice dam grows, it can creep under shingles. Then when it eventually melts, it can leak into your house, causing water damage.

The best way to prevent ice dams in the long run? Make sure your roof is properly insulated and properly ventilated.

The best thing to do now to prevent ice dams in tomorrow's storm? If your roof is prone to getting ice dams, rake the eaves off periodically to prevent buildup. If buildup occurs, fill a nylon stocking with magnesium chloride ice melt. (Make sure it's magnesium chloride so you don't damage your roofing materials.) Toss the stocking onto the edge of your roof where the ice is forming and let it melt it off.

Tomorrow's expected to be windy, though, so with any luck, your roof will stay clear.